Navigate Up
Human Relations Menu +
Home > Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Last modified: 3/14/2012 11:27 AM

 

 

 

A Client Portal will be emailed to you. You may create an account and pay using our online payment portal. Alternatively, payment may be made through cash or checks payable to Santa Clara County.

Santa Clara County
2310 N. First St. Ste. 100
San Jose CA 95131

The initiating party pays a $40 Case Processing Fee.

No one is turned away because of inability to pay for mediation. Fee waivers are available. Please contact the office for more information (408) 792-2314.

Yes. You will receive an electronic receipt, or standard receipt, depending on method of payment.

The California Evidence Code section 1120(b)(3) stipulates that the mere fact that a mediation has occurred, or that a mediator is serving, will serve, or was contacted to serve in a mediation is not confidential.

No, but rescheduling is discouraged.

You have 10 working days after your mediation appointment to reopen your case without additional fees.

It depends, but mediation is typically exponentially less expensive than court costs and filing fees, much less attorney’s fees. See the Superior Court’s self help website: http://www.scscourt.org/forms_filing.shtml

As long as both the parties and the mediator(s) so desire, and the parties stay in contact with the mediator with no gaps in contact longer than 10 days.

You will receive “conflict coaching” from our team, who will work with you to develop options and skills to handle the case on your own.

Every mediator has a different professional background. Mediators cannot give legal advice.
Although parties are encouraged to discuss between themselves individually, if a lawyer is requested to attend, s/he must be allowed to do so. However, a party is not required to participate in a mediation, and attorney presence may discourage party attendance.
No. Mediators are selected by staff according to a complex set of professional standards of discretion.
You have ten working days after your mediation appointment to reopen your case without additional fees. Contact with the Program after ten days, even on the same case, will require another fee payment.
We will make every effort to contact the other party. We will cease contact with non-responsive parties when it becomes clear that the party has had multiple opportunities to speak with Program staff.
Yes, you will receive “conflict coaching” from our team, who will work with you to develop options and skills to handle the case on your own.
Yes, the $40 Case Processing Fee is charged on the basis of staff’s efforts to open a case within our database, and their efforts to contact the other parties.
There is no flat limit on the number of mediation sessions afforded to clients. When a mediation should terminate, or how many sessions the parties may require are complex decisions made jointly by the parties and the mediator.

In addition to providing personal support for hate crime victims hate incident and hate crime victims, one of the best responses is to assist victims in reporting. Contact

 

Telephone Directory

Emergency ​911

Santa Clara County District Attorney

http://www.santaclara-da.org/

​(408) 299-7400
Anti-Hate Hotline​ ​(408) 279-0111
​Fair Employment & Housing Commission ​(800) 884-1648
Victim-Witness Assistance​ ​(408) 295-2656

Local Police Department

California Highway Patrol (408) 277-1800
Campbell Police Department​ ​(408) 866-2121

Gilroy Police Department​

​(408) 848-0350
​Los Altos Police Department ​(650) 948-8223
​Milpitas Police Department ​(408) 942-2400
Morgan Hill Police Department​ ​(408) 779-2101
Mt. View Police Department​ ​(408) 903-6395
​Palo Alto Police Department ​(408) 329-2406
San Jose Police Department
 
​(408) 277-8900
Santa Clara Police Department​ (408) 261-5300
Sunnyvale Police Department​ ​(408) 730-7110
Sheriff's Department​ ​(408) 299-2673

Help victims to understand that providing information may increase the chances that the perpetrator of hate incidents and hate crimes will be identified and prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Reporting a hate incident or hate crime often provides victims with the chance to express their concerns, fears, anger, or other emotions. It will also facilitate the victims' realization that they are not alone or responsible for the incident or criminal act perpetrated against them. These important steps also enable victims to begin the healing process.
 
* The Network for a Hate Free Community recognizes that fear of reprisal may be a real concern for the victim or the witness of a hate incident or hate crime. Therefore the Hotline Network for a Hate-Free Community and the Human Relations Commission will accept anonymous calls with the understanding that an investigation and supportive follow up may be very limited.

Department
(408) 299-2673
 
Help victims to understand that providing information may increase the chances that the perpetrator of hate incidents and hate crimes will be identified and prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Reporting a hate incident or hate crime often provides victims with the chance to express their concerns, fears, anger, or other emotions. It will also facilitate the victims' realization that they are not alone or responsible for the incident or criminal act perpetrated against them. These important steps also enable victims to begin the healing process.
 
​Hate incidents are activities of a non-criminal nature, such as: name calling, speech making, demonstrations, distribution of printed materials that are intentionally designed to defame individuals of a group because of their race, ethnic background, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability.
 
​The term “hate crime” describes any of various crimes of violence against a person, threats of violence against a person or property damage because of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, gender or sexual orientation, or because there is a perception the person has one or more of those characteristics.
 
​Assault is a common occurrence in our communities, today. An assault that takes place during a robbery however is not a hate crime. But an assault that is accompanied by derogatory reference to the race, ethnic background, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability of the victim is deemed to be motivated by bigotry, and is considered a hate crime.
  
  • ​Call the police and/or someone on the Community Referral List for help.
  • Seek medical attention for injuries.
  • Document the exact words spoken to you by the criminal as soon as practical.
  • Photograph property damage.
  • Save any evidence that might aid in the apprehension and prosecution of the criminal.
  • Inform members of your community.
Recognize that victims of hate tend to feel especially vulnerable because they have been attacked simply because of who they are. Hate incidents and hate crimes penetrate the very heart of an individual's sense of self by saying "Who you are is not acceptable." It is up to each of us to assure victims that they are valued members of our community.
 
Visit or call hate incident and crime victims to show that you are concerned about them and want to help. If the crime includes damage to property, coordinate a neighborhood repair and cleanup effort. This not only demonstrates support for victims, but also lets the perpetrators see that bigotry and intolerance are not accepted in the community.
 
In cases involving injuries to the victim, offer to assist with activities of daily living until the victim can resume his or her normal activities.
 
Respond to hate incidents and crimes that occur on school campuses through a coordinated effort the school principle or president. A presentation or facilitated dialogue on the harmful effects of bigotry and intolerance could heighten community understanding and healing.
Hate incidents and hate crimes penetrate the very heart of an individual's sense of self by saying "Who you are is not acceptable." It is up to each of us to assure victims that they are valued members of our community.
 
Visit or call hate incident and crime victims to show that you are concerned about them and want to help. If the crime includes damage to property, coordinate a neighborhood repair and cleanup effort. This not only demonstrates support for victims, but also lets the perpetrators see that bigotry and intolerance are not accepted in the community.
 
In cases involving injuries to the victim, offer to assist with activities of daily living until the victim can resume his or her normal activities.
 
Respond to hate incidents and crimes that occur on school campuses through a coordinated effort the school principle or president.