DFCS Online Policies & Procedures

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Handbook 3: Assessment Guides
3-3 Allegation Guide III:  Lack/Inadequacy of Supervision and Hazardous Home/Inadequate Necessities
Assessment Guides
3-3  Allegation Guide III: Lack/Inadequacy of Supervision and Hazardous Home/Inadequate Necessities
Reference Points
Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present
Inadequate Supervision, Parent Absent
Inadequate Supervision-Lockout
Abandonment
Parent Hospitalized
Parent Incarcerated
Parent Deceased
Other Lack/Inadequacy of Supervision
Hazardously Unsanitary Conditions
Hazardously Inadequate/Unsafe Shelter
Inadequate Clothing
Inadequate Food


Reference Points
Effective Date: 03/01/06
Last Updated: 12/30/05


Lack of Supervision:  Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present  

Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present

  • Description

The child has been placed in a situation or circumstances which are likely to require judgment or actions greater than the child's level or maturity, or physical and/or mental abilities would reasonably dictate, and the potential risk of harm to the child exists. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • Parent is present but unable to supervise the child because of parent's condition.
      • This includes a parent whose use of drugs or alcohol has produced a state of stupor, unconsciousness, intoxication or irrationality, and a parent who cannot supervise the child due to medical, behavioral, mental and/or emotional problems, developmental disability or physical handicap.
    • Parent is present but fails or refuses to supervise the child. This would include a parent who intentionally ignores or fails to monitor the child's whereabouts and actions.


  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation may come from any or all of the following, depending on the conduct alleged: statements of law enforcement officer, CSW, witness(es) or the child; or, direct admission of alleged perpetrator.


  • Factors to Consider
    The following factors should be considered when determining whether a child is inadequately supervised:
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age and developmental stage, particularly as related to the ability to make sound judgments.
      • Child's physical condition, particularly as related to the child's ability for self-care and self-protection.
      • Child's mental abilities, particularly as related to the ability to comprehend his/her situation.
    • Parent Factors
      • Whereabouts of parent.
      • How long does it take the parent to reach the child?
      • Can the parent see and/or hear the child?
      • Is the parent accessible by telephone?
      • Parent's physical, mental and emotional capabilities.
      • Parent's soundness of judgment of child's abilities.
      • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

        1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

        2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

      • Did the parent or legal guardian:

        1) personally commit the harmful act

        2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

        3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful act

      • Incident Factors
        • Frequency of occurrence.
        • Duration of occurrence.
        • Time of day or night incident(s) occurred.
      • Availability/presence/capability of a support person who is overseeing the child.
    • Environment Factors
      • Child's location.
      • Physical hazards present, when the child's maturity, physical condition and mental abilities are considered.
    •  
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate supervision where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian negligently or willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the failure to provide adequate supervision where physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(Severe)
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Lack of Supervision:  Inadequate Supervision, Parent Absent  

Inadequate Supervision, Parent Absent

  • Description

The child has been placed in a situation or circumstances which are likely to require judgment or actions greater than the child's level of maturity, or physical and/or mental abilities would reasonably dictate, and the potential risk of harm to the child exists. Examples include, but are not limited to:

    • Leaving child in the care of an inadequate or inappropriate caregiver.
    • Leaving alone a child who is too young to provide self-care.
    • Leaving alone a child who has a condition which requires close supervision. Such conditions may include medical conditions, behavioral, mental or emotional problems, developmental disabilities and/or physical handicaps.
    • Leaving child unattended in a place which is unsafe.
    • Leaving child alone before or after school, with or without access to the home, while the parent is at work.
  • Guidelines
    Same as for Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present.


  • Factors to Consider
    Same as for Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present, except for Parent Factors which do not apply when the parent is absent.
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate supervision where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian negligently or willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the failure to provide adequate supervision where physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(Severe)
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Lack of Supervision: Inadequate Supervision-Lockout  

Inadequate Supervision - Lockout

  • Description

The parent has denied, or threatens to deny, the child access to the home for at least one overnight period and has refused or failed to make provisions for another suitable living arrangement for the child during that time.

  • Guidelines
    Same as for Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present.


  • Factors to Consider
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age and developmental stage, particularly as related to the ability to make sound judgments.
      • Child's physical condition, particularly as related to the child's ability for self-care and self-protection.
      • Child's mental abilities, particularly as related to the ability to comprehend his/her situation.
      • Is child capable of making an appropriate alternative arrangement and has (s)he done so?
    • Parent Factors
      • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

        1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

        2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

      • Did the parent or legal guardian 1) personally commit the harmful act, 2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or 3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts?
    • Incident Factors
      • Frequency of occurrence.
      • Duration of occurrence.
      • Time of day or night incident(s) occurred.
      • Availability/presence/capability of a support person who is overseeing the child.
        •  
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate shelter where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate shelter? - Neglect(Severe
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Lack of Supervision:  Abandonment  

Abandonment

  • Description
    A situation in which the parent/legal guardian (or, in the absence of a parent/legal guardian, the person responsible for the child's welfare) leaves the child, with or without a caregiver, with the willful intent of rejecting parental obligations and making no effort to communicate with the child. Examples of abandonment include, but are not limited to:
    • Leaving an infant/young child in a public place.
    • Leaving an infant at someone's doorstep or in a trash container.
    • Leaving a child with a related or unrelated caregiver with no intention of returning and no plan for the child's future care/support and making no effort to communicate with the child.
    • Leaving a child with a related or unrelated caregiver with the stated intention of returning and then intentionally failing to do so and making no effort to communicate with the child.
  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation may come from any or all of the following, depending on the conduct alleged: a psychiatric or psychological opinion; statements of law enforcement officer, CSW, witness(es) or the child; or, direct admission of alleged perpetrator.

    Note that to be described as abandonment, willful intent to be absent from and not in communication with the child must be demonstrated. Involuntary absence, such as incarceration, hospitalization or death (see E-54 through 56), are not considered abandonment.


  • Factors to Consider
    • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

      1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

      2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

    • Did the parent or legal guardian:

      1) personally commit the harmful act,

      2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

      3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts?

  • Most Likely Classifications
    Is/was this abandonment the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered? - Neglect(Severe)
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Lack of Supervision:  Parent Hospitalized  

Parent Hospitalized

  • Description
    The parent, legal guardian or other person responsible for the child's welfare has been hospitalized and immediate plans must be made for the child's care.


  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as the result of the failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide the care and protection necessary for the child's healthy growth and development? Code as Neglect(General) if no physical injury has occurred. Code as Neglect (Severe) if physical injury has occurred.
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Lack of Supervision Parent Incarcerated  

Parent Incarcerated

  • Description
    The parent, legal guardian or other person responsible for the child's welfare has been incarcerated and immediate plans must be made for the child's care.


  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as the result of the failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide the care and protection necessary for the child's healthy growth and development? Code as Neglect(General) if no physical injury has occurred. Code as Neglect (Severe) if physical injury has occurred.
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Lack of Supervision:  Parent Deceased  

Parent Deceased

  • Description
    The parent, legal guardian or other person responsible for the child's welfare has died and immediate plans must be made for the child's care.


  • Most Likely Classifications
    Did this situation occur as the result of the failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide the care and protection necessary for the child's healthy growth and development? Code as Neglect(General) if no physical injury has occurred. Code as Neglect (Severe) if physical injury has occurred.
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Lack of Supervision:  Other Lack/Inadequacy of Supervision  

Other Lack/ Inadequacy of Supervision

  • Description
    Any situation not described by E-50 through E-56 in which the parent, legal guardian or other person responsible for the child's welfare fails or is unable to:
    • Provide or arrange for adequate supervision of that child.
    • Protect the child from inflicted physical, mental or sexual maltreatment or harm caused by the acts of another when it would have been reasonable to do so.
    • Prevent the exploitation of the child.
     
  • Guidelines
    See Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present.


  • Factors to Consider
    See Inadequate Supervision, Parent Present.


  • Most Likely Classifications

Did this situation occur as:

    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate shelter where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate supervision where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate shelter? - Neglect(Severe)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian negligently or willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the failure to provide adequate supervision where physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(Severe)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered? - Neglect(Severe)
    • the result of the failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide the care and protection necessary for the child's healthy growth and development? Code as Neglect(General) if no physical injury has occurred. Code as Neglect (Severe) if physical injury has occurred.
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Hazardous Home:  Hazardously Unsanitary Conditions  

Hazardously Unsanitary Conditions

  • Description
    Child's person, clothing and/or living conditions are unsanitary to the point that his/her health may be impaired. Examples of such conditions include, but are not limited to:
    • Rotten, moldy, or insect-infested food within the reach of a young child.
    • Human or animal excrement in a location which threatens the child's health.
    • Poisons, drugs, alcohol, noxious substances or other harmful substances within the reach of a young child.
    • Unsanitary plumbing conditions.
    • Rodent or insect infestation which threatens the child's health.
    • Peeling lead-based paint within the reach of a young child.
    • Clothing so filthy that it threatens the child's health.
    • Child's personal hygiene so poor that it threatens the child's health.
     
  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation requires the determination that the alleged conditions do exist or did exist and securing credible evidence that they are the result of neglect.


  • Factors to Consider
    Special attention should be paid to the child's physical condition and the living conditions in the home in order to determine whether the situation actually constitutes an allegation of harm. In addition, the following factors should be considered:
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age (children age 6 years and younger are more likely to be harmed).
      • Child's developmental stage.
      • Child's physical condition.
      • Child's mental abilities.
      • Child's unwillingness to go home; extended stays at school (early arrival, late departures).
    • Parent Factors
      • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

        1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

        2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

      • Did the parent or legal guardian:

        1) personally commit the harmful act,

        2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

        3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts?

      • Incident Factors
          • Severity of conditions.
          • Frequency of occurrence.
          • Duration of occurrence.
          • Chronicity or pattern of similar conditions.
             
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Are these conditions:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate clothing where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate shelter where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate clothing? - Neglect(Severe)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate shelter? - Neglect(Severe)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered? - Neglect(Severe)
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Hazardous Home:  Hazardously Inadequate/Unsafe Shelter  

Hazardously Inadequate/ Unsafe Shelter

  • Description
    Failure or refusal to provide, seek or accept shelter which is safe which protects the child from the elements and other risk conditions when it is reasonably possible to do so. Examples of inadequate shelter include, but are not limited to:
    • No housing or shelter.
    • Housing which has been condemned or has serious structural defects.
    • Exposed electrical wiring or broken glass (e.g., windowpanes) within the reach of a young child.
    • Firearms or other deadly weapons within the reach of a young child or adolescent.
    • Broken stairs or railings which are accessible to a young child.
    • Housing which is a fire hazard or has an unsafe heat source.
     
  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation requires the determination that the alleged conditions do exist or did exist and securing credible evidence that they are the result of neglect.

    The element of failure or refusal, as noted in Description, above, is the key factor in verifying this allegation. Homelessness, in and of itself, does not constitute neglect.


  • Factors to Consider
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age.
      • Child's developmental stage.
      • Child's physical condition, particularly when it may be aggravated by the inadequacy of the shelter.
      • Child's mental abilities, particularly as they relate to the child's ability to comprehend the dangers posed by the inadequate shelter.
      • Child's unwillingness to go home; extended stays at school (early arrival, late departures).
    • Parent Factors
      • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

        1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

        2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

      • Did the parent or legal guardian:

        1) personally commit the harmful act,

        2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

        3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts

    • Shelter Factors
      • Seriousness of the problem.
      • Frequency of the problem.
      • Duration of the problem.
      • Pattern or chronicity of the problem.
      • Previous history of shelter-related problems.
     
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Are these conditions:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate shelter where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate shelter? - Neglect(Severe)
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Inadequate Necessities:  Inadequate Clothing  

Inadequate Clothing

  • Description
    The failure or refusal to provide adequate clothing for the health and well-being of the child when it is reasonably possible to do so. Examples of inadequate clothing include, but are not limited to:
    • Failure to provide clothing to protect the child from the weather.
    • Failure to provide clean outerwear and/or underwear as necessary for daily living.
    • Clothing, including shoes, which is much too big or small.


  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation requires the determination that the alleged conditions do exist or did exist and securing credible evidence that they are the result of neglect.


  • Factors to Consider
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age.
      • Child's developmental stage.
      • Child's physical condition, particularly with regard to conditions which may be aggravated by exposure to the elements.
      • Child's mental abilities, particularly as they relate to the child's ability to obtain appropriate clothing.
    • Parent Factors
    • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

      1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

      2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

    • Did the parent or legal guardian:

      1) personally commit the harmful act,

      2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

      3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts?

    • Incident Factors
      • Frequency of the incident.
      • Duration of the incident.
      • Chronicity or pattern of similar incidents.
      • Weather conditions.
       
  • Most Likely Classifications
    Is this situation:
    • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate clothing where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
    • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate clothing? - Neglect(Severe)
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Inadequate Necessities:  Inadequate Food  

Inadequate Food

  • Description
    The failure or refusal to provide or have available food adequate to sustain normal functioning of the child when it is reasonably possible to do so. It is not as serious as malnutrition or failure-to-thrive, which are discussed in Risk Factor G and which require a medical diagnosis. Examples of inadequate food include, but are not limited to:
    • The child who frequently and repeatedly misses meals or who is frequently and repeatedly fed insufficient amounts of food.
    • The child who frequently and repeatedly begs for or steals food and other information substantiates that the child is not being fed.
    • The child who frequently and repeatedly is fed food which is unwholesome, taking into account the child's age, developmental stage and physical condition.
     
  • Guidelines
    Some indicators, taken separately, are not necessarily symptomatic of abuse, neglect or exploitation. They must be examined within the context of other characteristics of the family to determine whether or not the child is at risk.

    Verification of this allegation requires the determination that the alleged conditions do exist or did exist and securing credible evidence that they are the result of neglect.
  • Factors to Consider
    • Child Factors
      • Child's age.
      • Child's developmental stage.
      • Child's physical condition, particularly as related to the need for a special diet.
      • Child's mental abilities, particularly as they relate to the child's ability to obtain and prepare adequate food.
    • Parent Factors
    • Did this harm/injury/maltreatment occur as the result of an action or lack of action which:

      1) meets CDSS' definitions of abuse, neglect or exploitation and

      2) is directly attributable to the child's parent or legal guardian?

    • Did the parent or legal guardian:

      1) personally commit the harmful act,

      2) condone or permit a harmful act by other persons in circumstances in which it would be reasonably possible to prevent the harm, or

      3) force, allow or coerce the child to commit harmful acts?

    • Incident Factors
      • Frequency of the incident.
      • Duration of the incident.
      • Pattern of chronicity of occurrence.
      • Previous history of occurrences.
      • Availability of adequate food.


  • Most Likely Classifications
    Is this situation:
      • the result of the negligent failure of a parent/legal guardian to provide adequate food where no physical injury has occurred? - Neglect(General)
      • the result of a parent/legal guardian willfully causing or permitting the person or health of the child to be placed in a situation such that his/her person or health is endangered through the intentional failure to provide adequate food? - Neglect(Severe)
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