[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]

  DFCS Online Policies & Procedures

  DFCS Online Policies & Procedures

   [an error occurred while processing this directive]
[an error occurred while processing this directive]
   <<< Return to OPP Table of Contents [an error occurred while processing this directive]
Handbook 10: Contacts and Visitation
10-5  Visitation Protocol

 

Contacts and Visitation
10-5  Visitation Protocol
Reference Points
Overview
Levels of Supervision
Visitation Venues
Phases of Visitation
Visitation Assessment and Planning Worksheet

Factors to Consider when Developing an Initial Visitation Plan

General Guidelines for Visitation Observation and Reporting
Factors to Consider when Reassessing the Visitation Plan
Visitation Transition Planning
Reporting to the Court
Role of The Child's Social Worker
Role and Activities for Substitute Care Providers
Other Reference Points


Reference Points
Effective Date: 10/1/08
Last Updated: 8/24/12
 Legal Basis:
pdf California Department of Social Services (CDSS) Manual of Policies and Procedures (MPP) Division 31-340, 31-345
Popup Window Welfare and Institutions Code (WIC) §16501.1 (f)(5)and(e)
Popup Window WIC §10553, §10554
 Non CWS/CMS Forms:
MS Word Supervised Visitation Authorization (SCZ1382)
MS Word DFCS Visitation Guidelines (SCZ1382A)
MS Word Intensive Intervention Visitation Referral Form (SCZ 77)
MS Word Request to Change a Court Order (JV-180)
MS Word Supervised Visitation Resources for Santa Clara County (3/20/09)
MS Word Volunteer Request Form (SCZ 559)
MS Word Visitation Assessment and Planning Worksheet
MS Word Visitation Plan
MS Word Visitation Recommendations for Success
 CWS/CMS Forms:
bullet Services Management Section : Contact Notebook


Overview  

The visitation protocol supports families with children in out-of home care in participating in a visitation program that promotes progressive and improved parenting skills with a systematic reduction in the need for structured, supervised visits.  A positive by-product of the protocol is the completion of a quarterly visitation assessment every three (3) months by the assigned social worker for all families on their caseloads who are receiving Family Reunification services.

The visitation protocol is based on a strength-based approach involving increased interaction, mentoring, role-modeling, and constructive feedback.  The planned outcome is to improve parenting skills and move families to a least restrictive setting for visits as they make progress towards reunification.  The protocol provides a framework for social workers to approach the use and course of visitation as one of the most powerful tools and indicators of reunification success for families.

The goal of the Department of Family and Children's Services (DFCS) is to create a team approach to the provision of court-ordered visits and to apply the visitation protocol to all visitation sites.

    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Levels of Supervision  

In determining the appropriate visitation setting, the social worker takes into consideration a variety of factors such as the court orders and the parent's protective capacity.

The five types of settings for visitation include:

Security Visits

  • Security visits are highly structured visits conducted in the presence of a security guard.  The primary characteristic of security visits is the need for clear, concrete, and, at times, more restrictive parameters to be in place during visitation.  Examples include security visits that need a uniformed security guard for visits where sexual abuse or domestic violence has been an issue in the family. 
    • Security Levels for Visits
      • Level I

      One-to-one supervision of visits by DFCS staff in which a participant has a history of violence or there is concern of violence.  A security guard is nearby and available during the visit. 

      These visits are usually held at 373 W. Julian Street in a Building 2 Visitation Observation Room.

      • Level II

      One-to-one supervision of visits by DFCS staff in which a participant has threatened another participant or social worker.  These visits are held at 373 W Julian Street San Jose, CA where a safety officer is present.  Other security visitation venues may be arranged after a staffing and administrative approval. 

      See OPP Chapter 10-5.1: Arranging Secure Visitation.

      • Level III Jail-Prison Supervision

      Supervised visits can include face-to-face or window contact visits, depending upon court orders, facility rules, age of the child(ren), and programs available at the facility.

 




Intensive Therapeutic Visits

  • The purpose of intensive therapeutic visitation is to address specific and identified relationship-based issues that are interfering with the parent-child relationship and that can be addressed in the context of visitation. Examples include parents and/or child(ren) with specific mental health issues and cases in which there is extreme parent-child conflict. From a clinical perspective these visits are therapeutic in nature.

These visits are referred to and scheduled at Kindred Souls Family Visitation Center.




Interactive Visits

  • During interactive visits, a visitation monitor directly engages visit participants in interactive learning directed toward improving parenting behaviors, improving relationships skills, and integrating into the visit the parent's knowledge gained through parenting classes, therapy, and other case-plan related activities.  Interactive learning is achieved through the use of mentoring, role-modeling, constructive feedback, and discussion. 

Interactive visits may occur at any visitation site.   They may be monitored by the child's social worker, a Social Worker I, or other designated DFCS staff, a Foster Family Agency (FFA) case manager, foster parents, group home staff, a relative, or a volunteer, depending upon the individual's experience and comfort level with the interactive model.

 



Monitored Observational Visits

  • Monitored-observational visits occur with the sole intent of providing straight observation of the participants' interaction with little or no interaction between the participants and the social worker or individual observing the visit. This type of visit most often occurs during the initial assessment phase, during which the visit is observed by or in conjunction with the child's social worker, and an assessment is made as to the type of visit that would best fit the family's needs.  Monitored-observational visits also might be indicated in certain instances of extreme mental health issues of a parent or for a final visit between a parent and child when parental rights are being terminated.

Refer to Supervised Visitation Resources for Santa Clara County (3/20/09) for a list of venues available to social workers for supervised visitation.

Referrals for ongoing monitored-observational visits may be made South County, to Chamberlain's Children's CenterMonitored observational visits may also be arranged with Social Worker I, II, and III; Group home staff; Foster Family Agency (FFA) case managers; foster parents; relatives/ NREFMs; and volunteer case aids.

See General Guidelines for Visitation Observation and Reporting.




Unsupervised Visits

  • Unsupervised visits are those visits that occur between the parents and child without any observation or monitoring.  The goal of the Department is to assist families in improving their parenting skills and moving to a least restrictive, i.e. unsupervised, visitation setting as they make progress towards reunification.  If the parent has made significant progress towards Family Reunification, the primary social worker considers recommending unsupervised visits.  Court orders must exist or be obtained authorizing unsupervised visits before they may occur.
 
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Phases of Visitation  

The visitation process has three phases, each associated with specific tasks.  Any of the types of visitation settings described in the section above may meet the needs of the family during any of the three phases outlined below.  One type of visit can be combined with another type within each phase, for example, interactive and monitored-observational visits may both occur in Phase II.  Special parameters may exist for cases involving issues of sexual abuse and domestic violence and may be applied to any type of visit in any phase of visitation.

 

PHASE I:  Assessment

  • Phase I generally occurs when a child first enters the child welfare system, and this phase lasts approximately two weeks.  The goal of the assessment phase is to determine an appropriate starting point for the visitation setting for the parent and child.  
  • As soon as can be arranged, but no more than ten (10) days from when a child is placed in temporary custody, a visit should be conducted to include “support system” individuals identified by the child and approved by the social worker.  The intent of this visit is to maintain connectivity with family for children entering the foster care system.
  • During this phase, the social worker schedules all visits.
    • Schedules all visits.
     
    • Observes one or two visits between the parent(s) and child(ren).
     
    • Determines the appropriate starting point for visitation, factoring in court parameters and assessments from the social worker's observations of initial visits.

    • Establishes secondary visitation parameters, including identification of extended family visitors, gifts, mail, telephone contact, email, etc.
      • Individuals identified by the child that make up the child's support system should be included in the visitation plan.

    • If visits are to be supervised at a DFCS visitation site, completes a Supervised Visitation Authorization (SCZ1382) and makes all arrangements for the visit.


    • If visits are arranged to be supervised by foster parents, facilitates an Ice Breaker meeting during which the foster parents and birth parents meet with the intention of sharing information about the child and normalizing relationships.

 
  • The assessment made during Phase I provides the basis for the social worker's visitation recommendations to the court in the Jurisdictional/Dispositional Report. 



PHASE II: Reassessment

  • After three (3) months of visitation, and every three (3) months thereafter, the primary social worker completes a quarterly reassessment in which a reevaluation is made regarding the level of supervision required, the frequency and durations of visits, and the appropriate venue for visitation.  In making the reassessments, the social worker considers factors such as the nature of the parent/child interaction, the parent's progress with the case plan, and whether safety issues exist.   An appropriate transition plan is developed for visitation if applicable.   See the following sections Factors to Consider when Reassessing the Visitation Plan and Visitation Transition Planning.

As part of the visitation reassessment, a determination is made whether to:

  • Increase, decrease or maintain the frequency and/or duration of the visits.
  • Move to a less restrictive visitation setting, a more restrictive visitation setting, or to not change the setting.
  • Change the venue of the visits.
  • Make a change as to the person supervising the visits if visits are supervised.

    Any change made to the visitation arrangements must be authorized by the court, if not already a part of the court orders.  The social worker may submit a Request to Change a Court Order (JV-180) to change orders in between court hearings.  The case plan must be updated to reflect any changes to the visitation arrangements.

  • At the time of the each Status Review Hearing, the social worker documents in the court report under the Visitation heading a complete reassessment of the pattern and quality of visitation.   The written reassessment in the court report follows from the quarterly reassessments and includes visitation recommendations and the rationale for the recommendations.  See the section below Reporting to the Court.

 

     

PHASE III:  AFTERCARE PLANNING

  • When it is assessed that supervised visits should continue after the dismissal of dependency in which Guardianship or Family Court Orders are made, a Family Conference or TDM is scheduled approximately one or two months prior to the court hearing. The Family Conference or TDM includes the child's social worker, visitation social worker, relevant outside agency staff, parents or guardians, and invited family members. 
  • In cases where Family Reunification services are terminated, but parental rights are not terminated, a Family Conference or TDM may be held to determine provision of on-going supervised visitation.
 
  • In cases involving termination of parental rights, a final visit is held when appropriate.  The assigned social worker determines the level of supervision needed for the final visit in consultation with the caregiver, attorneys, and the Court. 
    • A final visit is always be supervised by the primary social worker.
  • The issue of sibling contact should be considered in any aftercare decision plan. 
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Visitation Assessment and Planning Worksheet   Social workers may use the Visitation Assessment and Planning Worksheet as a tool when determining appropriate frequency and duration of visits, venue for the visits, and supervisor and supervision level for visits.
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   

Factors to

Consider when Developing an Initial Visitation Plan

 

Each initial visitation plan must be developed individually, taking into account the child's and parent's needs.  In determining the supervision level, venue, and frequency and duration of visits for the initial visitation plan, the following factors should be considered:

  • Under what service program (FRS or VFR) will the family be receiving services?
  • What is the purpose of visitation?
  • Has the primary social worker supervised at least one visit between the parent and child as part of the worker's clinical assessment regarding visitation issues?
  • What is the age of the child? 

    • Consider the possible benefit of having more frequent visits of shorter duration between single parents and infants.
  •  
  • What is the nature of the relationship between the child and the parent?
  • Are there cultural or language considerations?
    • Is it necessary to request services of an interpreter to translate for the person supervising the visits.
  • Who does the child define as family?

    • Has an effort been made to schedule visitation with significant people in the child's life?
  • Who will visit the child? Parents? Siblings? Extended Family? Others?

    • Visitation arrangements between the child and the child's siblings and between the child and the child's grandparents is an ongoing requirement in the case plan.

  • What family factors are identified in the Comprehensive Assessment Tool?
  • In what type of home is the child placed?
    • Is the caregiver willing to have visits in his or her home or facility?
  • What is the concurrent plan for the child?
    • Is it one in which the parents' rights will not be terminated, signifying probable ongoing contact between the child and parent?
  • What level of visitation setting would be most appropriate for the family?  See the above section Levels of Supervision Settings.
    • Are there relatives, NREFMs, or foster parents available, able and willing to supervise visits?
    • Are there behavioral or mental health issues for the child(ren) or parent?  Are therapeutic or security visits indicated? 
    • Does the parent or child have a disability that requires accommodations?
    • Is the parent incarcerated? If so, what impact will visits and visit location have on the child?
    • What risks or safety factors exist for the child, parent, visitation supervisor, DFCS staff, community agency staff, or foster parents? Are security visits indicated? 

      • Are there active substance abuse concerns?
      • Is the child safe without supervision?
      • Is the child safe on an overnight visit?

  • Is a separate visit for each parent indicated?
    • Are there domestic violence concerns?
  •  
  • Are there events or meetings which parent and child could attend at the same time such as religious services?
  • Are there transportation issues?
  • Have the parents and caregiver been informed of the complete visitation arrangements?
     
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
General Guidelines for Visitation Observation and Reporting  

When supervising visitation between a child and parent(s), the observer considers the following factors and includes an observation or assessment on each item in the visitation report.

  • Did the parent arrive on time to the visit?
  • The nature of the parent's interaction with the child
  • The child's responses to the parent's interactions and interventions
  • Behaviors that reflect/reflected how the parent or child functioned during the visit
  • If the observer provides/provided any interactive feedbak to the parent and/or child, the response of the parent or child.
  • Did the parent stay for the entire visit?
  • Any concerns that arise/arose during the visit and the observable indicators that cause/caused the concern.
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Factors to

Consider when Reassessing the Visitation Plan

 

The status of visitation should reflect the parent's progress with the case plan and the prognosis for reunification.   For that reason, it is unlikely that visitation arrangements would remain stagnant throughout the course of services.  Every three months the social worker reassesses the visitation plan in terms of the supervision level, venue, and frequency and duration of the visits and adjusts the plan to meet the family's needs and progress.   Many of the factors considered in developing the initial visitation plan are also considered at the time reassessments are made. 

In reassessing a visitation plan, the following factors should also be considered:

  • Under what service program (FRS,VFR, PP) is the family receiving services, and what is the purpose of visitation?
  • What are the current, specific court orders for supervision level, venue, and frequency and duration of visits?  What level of discretion has the Court given the social worker in arranging the visits?
    • If the projected recommendation for a Status Review Hearing is for a return of the children to the parents, unsupervised visits should begin if not already occurring.
    • Any change made to the visitation arrangements must be authorized by the court, if not already a part of the court orders.

  • Have all visitation reports been reviewed by the primary social worker?

  • What interactions or behaviors has the parent shown during the visits that demonstrates that he or she has integrated information and direction provided in parenting classes, counseling, or interactive feedback?  Are there examples of the parent:
    • Providing positive reinforcement? 
    • Having been responsive to suggestions made during interactive visits?
    • Demonstrating effective and appropriate responses to the child's behaviors and needs?
  • Have there been any issues that have been identified during visits that are of concern?
    • For example, inappropriate conversation or communication between parent and child?
  •  
  • Has the parent been made aware of any identified concerns of the visitation supervisor or social worker?
    • What was the parent's response to the concerns?
  • Does the parent bring snacks, toys, books, or activities or make an effort to use items available at the visitation site to help engage the child during visits?
  •  
  • What has been the child's reaction to the visits?

  • What has been the parent's response to the visits?
  • Is the child's concurrent placement being considered in the decision as to the appropriate supervision level and frequency of visits.
    • The consideration is impacted by the child's age, permanent plan, relationship between the concurrent caregiver and the parent, and the length of time for which reunification services will continue to be offered.
    • Is consideration being given to recommending that reunification services be terminated?
    • Is it  probable that the parent will have ongoing contact with the child after the case is dismissed?

  • What has been the parent's progress in addressing the issues that resulted in the removal of the child from the family home?
  • Do the parents visit together or separately?
  • If separate visitation for each parent was initially ordered due to domestic violence issues, and it is assessed that the parents can begin joint visits, explain the dynamics between the parents, progress each parent has made with services, and observations made directly by the social worker of the parents' interaction that would support the recommendation.
  • If the parent was the perpetrator, what is the parent's progress with services and what level of treatment has been completed?
  • What is the parent's capacity to protect the child from the perpetrator or from harm in general?
  • Do risks or safety factors continue or have risk factors been newly identified for the child, parent, visitation supervisor, DFCS staff, CBO staff or foster parents? Are security visits indicated?

  • Is a move to another level of frequency, supervision level or venue necessary or appropriate at this time?
    • Unsupervised Visits
      • If the quality of visitation is considered to be good, a move to unsupervised visits should be considered.
      • If the projected recommendation for a Status Review Hearing is for a return of the children to the parents, unsupervised visits should begin if not already occurring.

    • Therapeutic visits


    • Visits supervised by Social Worker I's
      • Historically, the Department has utilized  Social Worker I's to supervise visits for the assigned primary social worker. Visits can take place:
      • In one of the Visiting Rooms near the lobby of the Department of Family and Children's Services, 373 W. Julian St., San Jose, CA.
      • In South County at the Gilroy Family Resource Center (GFRC).

    • Visits supervised by foster parents, relative caregivers, non-relative extended family members (NREFMs), and Foster Family Agencies (FFA's)
    • Foster parents, relative caregivers, NREFMs and FFA case managers are encouraged to supervise visits to develop a positive rapport with the child's parents, reduce anxiety, and normalize placement for the child.
      • Primary social workers may introduce Icebreakers involving the substitute caregivers and the parents to assist them in building a relationship.  The Icebreaker may take place at the Department of Family and Children's Services or an alternate location.  

    • Visits supervised by the Bill Wilson Volunteer Case Aide Program
      • The Case Aide Program is a volunteer program that provides support services to foster care children in Santa Clara County.  The Case Aide Program conducts supervised visits for children and families receiving child welfare services.  To request services, the social worker completes the Volunteer Request Form (SCZ 559) and submits it to Katie Howay, Bill WIlson Center, Phone/E-Fax, 408-278-4915 , email: khoway@bwcmail.org   

  • If it is assessed that visitation arrangements should not be less restrictive, what services might be offered so that less restrictive arrangements could occur in the future?

  • Do any changes need to be made or planned for regarding the visitation arrangements between the child and his or her siblings, grandparents, or significant others in terms of the level of supervision, venue, and frequency and duration of the visits?
    • Visitation arrangements between the child and the child's siblings and between the child and the child's grandparents is an ongoing requirement in the case plan.

  • If changes have been made to the visitation plan, is the parent clear about the changes and has the new plan been given to the parent in writing?  Have the caregivers been notified of the changes in the visitation plan?
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Visitation Transition Planning  

A visitation transition plan follows out of timelines set by the social worker to transition visits to the appropriate visitation frequency, supervision level and venue.   At the time reassessments of the visitation arrangements are made, the social worker considers a transition plan if it is projected that there will be a need for a lower or higher level of supervision, a change in venue, or a change in frequency or duration of the visits.  A Family Conference may be used to facilitate a discussion of the visitation transition plan. 

The following factors are considered in the Transition Plan.

  • The timetable and the intermediate steps needed to bridge the gap between:
    • The current supervision level and a move to a lower or higher level of supervision.
      • If moving to unsupervised visits, has there been a discussion with the parent regarding location(s) where unsupervised visits may occur or what activities might be planned during unsupervised visits?
      • If supervision continues to be required, has the substitute caregiver been involved in the visitation and, if not, what is the plan to transition the visits to the caregiver to supervise?
        • Has an Icebreaker been arranged between the caregiver and birth parent?  If there has not been an Ice Breaker Meeting, is there one being planned and what is the timeframe for the meeting?
      • If the child is placed through a Foster Family Agency, has the FFA social worker been involved in the visitation and, if not, what is the plan to transition the visits to the FFA social worker?
        • Has an Icebreaker been arranged between the FFA social worker and birth parent?  If there has not been an Ice Breaker Meeting, is there one being planned and what is the timeframe for the meeting?
     
    • The current venue or location and a less restrictive or more secure visitation location.
      • Has there been a discussion with the substitute caregiver regarding the possibility of visits occurring in the caregiver's home or facility?
      • Has a referral been made to Kindred Souls Visitation Center if that venue appears to be a more appropriate setting?
       
  • If a change to unsupervised visits is recommended, has consideration been given to a transitional visit to be supervised by the child's social worker?
  • If a recommendation will be made for a return of the child to the parent at the next Status Review Hearing, have arrangements been made for unsupervised visits to occur before the hearing date and actual return home?
  • If a recommendation is made for joint visits by parents and domestic violence has been an issue in their relationship, is the social worker prepared to or has the social worker already directly observed a joint visit to assess that the family interaction would serve the child's best interest.
  • If parental rights are going to be or have been terminated and it is appropriate to have a "good-by" visit, have appropriate arrangements been made for supervision of a "good-by" visit between the parent and child?
    • The child's social worker is expected to supervise final visits.
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Reporting to the Court  

At each Status Review Hearing, the social worker discusses visitation under the Visitation heading in the court report.  The discussion follows from and summarizes the quarterly visitation reassessments.  The recommendations for visitation for the next six months is reiterated under the Visitation section of the report and includes the level of supervision, venue, and frequency.  Any arrangements for visits between the child and siblings and child and grandparents is also discussed if applicable.  Following are guides for the visitation write-up in the court report.

  • Describe the current visitation arrangements between the parent(s) and child(ren).
    • Where are the visits occurring?
    • Who supervises the visits?
    • What is the level of supervision?
    • What is the current court order for frequency and duration?
    • Do the parents visit together or separately?
  • Give a quantitative summary of the visitation over the past six (6) months.
  •  

    • How many visits were scheduled?
    • How many visits did the parent(s) show for?
    • Were any visits missed?
      • What was the reason?
    • Were any visits cancelled?
      • Who cancelled?  What was the reason?
    • Were the parents or child ever late for the visit?
      • What was the reason
    • Were visits ever ended before the allotted time?
      • Who ended them?  What was the reason?
  • Give a qualitative summary of visitation over the past six (6) months.
  •  

    • Strengths
      • What positive interactions or behaviors between the parent and child have been observed or reported?
      • Are there interactions or behaviors that the parent has demonstrated during the visits that directly indicate that the parent has integrated information and direction provided from parenting classes, counseling, or interactive feedback?
    • Challenges
      • Are they any issues of concern?
        • How is the social worker working with the parent to resolve the issues?
  • Summarize the visitation arrangements and quality of the visits the child(ren) has with siblings, grandparents, and others.
  • Based on the assessment detailing the current visitation status and based on each parent’s progress with resolving issues that resulted in the child's removal, state the recommendation for visitation for the next six-month period.
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Role of the Child's Social Worker  

The role and responsibilities of the child's social worker are to:

  • Arrange the:
    • Schedule of the visitation with the parents and caregivers.
    • Venue for the visitation.
    • Person who is to supervise the visit.
  • If visits are held at a DFCS visitation site:
    • Complete a Supervised Visitation Authorization (SCZ1382).
    • Review the DFCS Visitation Guidelines (SCZ1382A) with all parties to the visit.

    See OPP Chapter 10-6: DFCS Visitation Sites.

     
  • Coordinate any activity with outside collaterals (therapists, child's attorney, probation officer, parent advocate, etc.) who might want to attend a supervised visit. 
  • If possible, supervise or observe one visit each quarter.
  • Complete an assessment and review of the court-ordered visitation plan every three (3) months to assess the appropriateness of the visitation setting, frequency, and venue.
    • If an assessment is made that visits could be less restrictive and there is no court order for the social worker to move to less restrictive visits, the social worker may submit an Application for Order to the court to recommend less restrictive visits.  The Case Plan must be updated if there is a change in visitation plan.
    • If an assessment is made that visits need to be more restrictive, the social worker submits an App and Order to the Court to recommend more restrictive visitation.  The Case Plan must be updated if there is a change in visitation plan.
  • Assure that parents, caregivers, and, if applicable, the person supervising the visits are informed of any changes to the existing visitation arrangements.
  • Provide on-going feedback to the individual supervising the visits regarding progress and strengths of the family, areas of concern, etc.
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Role & Activities for Substitute Care Providers  

The role and activities for substitute caregivers include: 

  • Providing written notes on the observational monitored visit to the caseworker for all visits that they supervise. The form and notes should reflect targeted areas for observations including the child’s behavior before and after the visit, positive parenting activities, areas of concern, etc.
     
  • Participating in an initial meeting, referred to as Ice Breaker, between birth parents and the caregivers, when safe, to allow information flow, normalization of relationships, and to reduce the tension and anxiety that the child and parents may experience. 
     
  • Following an Ice Breaker, escorting children to and from visits when appropriate and the care provider is available.
    • This is done in order to begin to normalize the child’s experience and to facilitate communication between parents and foster parents around the child’s behaviors and areas of common interest or concern. 
     
  • Taking responsibility for transporting children to/from visits, including make-up visits, and for providing more supportive activities to assist in case plan progress towards reunification.
 
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page
   
Other References  
doc2 Supervised Visitation Resources for Santa Clara County (3/20/09)
bullet2 OPP Chapter 10-5.1: Arranging Secure Visitation
bullet2 OPP Chapter 10-6: DFCS Visitation Sites
bullet2 OPP Chapter 8-15: Request to Change a Court Order (JV-180)
    < Return to OPP Table of Contents | ^ Back to Top of Page

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
[an error occurred while processing this directive]