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Eviction Moratorium Information for Landlords and Tenants

On August 31, 2020, the State of California legislature enacted, and the Governor signed, Assembly Bill No. 3088 that provides state-wide eviction and foreclosure protections for many residential tenants and property owners suffering from economic hardship due to COVID-19. The state law, which went into effect immediately, places specific limits on local ordinances. The residential tenant protections of the County’s eviction moratorium are deemed to have expired on August 31, 2020 and replaced by the state law protections. More information about how the state law protects residential tenants suffering from economic hardship due to COVID-19 and how residential tenants can receive the protections of the state law can be found here: https://landlordtenant.dre.ca.gov/faqs.html

Residential tenants who were protected from eviction while the County’s residential eviction moratorium was in effect must now pay back at least 50% of the past-due rent (rent due between March 24, 2020 through August 31, 2020) by February 28, 2021, and the remaining unpaid rent for that same time period by August 31, 2021. Landlords may not charge a late fee if tenants make such payments. 

For small business tenants who qualify for protection under the County’s ordinance, the County's eviction moratorium has been extended through November 30, 2020. Small business tenants have up to 6 months after the moratorium expires or terminates to repay at least 50% of the past-due rent, and up to 12 months after the moratorium expires or terminates to repay in full the past-due rent. Civil fines and penalties, monetary damages and injunctive relief may be imposed on landlords who seek to retaliate or deny small business tenants of their rights and protections under the ordinance.

This page is being updated regularly. Please check back often for the latest information.

Guidelines for the Eviction Moratorium

Information for Landlords of Small Business Tenants

If you are a landlord of a small business tenant that qualifies under the County’s eviction moratorium ordinance and you initiate an eviction for non-payment of rent during the moratorium, you must:

​You still have a right to collect rent if the small business tenant qualifies for protection under the moratorium. However, the protected small business tenant has 6 months after the moratorium ends to repay at least 50% of the past-due rent and 12 months after the moratorium ends to repay in full the past-due rent. You cannot charge a late fee. Before initiating any repayment plan with a small business tenant protected under this moratorium, you must first inform the small business tenant of these repayment protections​. ​ The ordinance prohibits negotiations between a landlord and small business tenant that result in the tenant’s waiver of its rights under the ordinance. You may risk being subject to civil fines and penalties, monetary damages and injunctive relief if you do not comply with the moratorium.

This moratorium does not apply to otherwise lawful or at-fault evictions for reasons other than nonpayment of rent due to a substantial loss and/or out-of-pocket medical expense as a result of COVID-19.

Information for Small Business Tenants

​If you are a small business tenant, you ​can use this form to provide your landlord with documentation of substantial income loss and/or substantial out-of-pocket medical expenses that is directly related to your failure to pay rent as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic as soon as possible.​​

Examples of substantial loss of income due to COVID-19 include:

  • Temporary closure of or reduction in operating hours of a place of business or substantial decrease in business income​
​Examples of documentation you can provide include:​

  • Bank statements or financial documents showing your business’ financial situation before and during the COVID-19 pandemic
​Your landlord must provide you this document​ telling you why you are being evicted, and what your rights are, as well as assistance programs​ if they try to evict you.
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You may be able to take your landlord to court if they do not comply with the moratorium or use their non-compliance in any eviction proceeding.

For more information about the eviction moratorium, please see our list of frequently asked questions​​.  
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Last updated: 10/19/2020 8:51 AM