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Know your diabetes risk score!

Knowing all the different risk factors is an important first step in preventing type 2 diabetes. Some key risk factors include: age, sex, blood pressure, level of physical activity, weight, family history of diabetes or heart disease, and a history of gestational diabetes during pregnancy or of giving birth to a baby over 9 pounds. Your test score is based on your answers to the key questions below about these risk factors.  A high score indicates a higher risk.


Take the diabetes risk assessment 

Answer the following  six questions to learn your diabetes risk score.  The assessment will 2-3 minutes to complete. Keep track of your points and add them up at the end to understand what your score means and what actions you should take to help prevent type 2 diabetes.

1. How old are you?

Less than 45 years (0 points)
45 years or older (8 points)

2. Find your height on the chart here to determine your points. If you are of Asian descent, add 15 pounds to your current weight before using the chart. Do you weigh as much as or more than the weight listed for your height? 


No (0 point)
Yes (8 points)
 

3. If you are a woman, have you ever been diagnosed with gestational diabetes?


No (0 point)
Yes (2 points)
 

4. Do you have a mother, father, sister, or brother with diabetes?


No (0 point) 
Yes (2 points)
 

5. Have you ever been diagnosed with high blood pressure, high blood or triglycerides?


No (0 point) 
Yes (1 point)
 

6. Do you get 30 minutes of physical activity in a typical day most days of the week?


No (2 points)
Yes (0 point)


Add all the points above to get your TOTAL SCORE.
 
What does a score of 0-9 points​ mean?
What does a score of 10 or higher mean?

*This prediabetes risk test only serves as a screening tool and does not replace the need for a more accurate lab-based test to diagnose either prediabetes or diabetes. Questions adapted from the American Diabetes Association risk assessment test.American Diabetes Association. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes - 2017.
 

Similar risk tests are also available from other on-line organizations in multiple languages:




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Last updated: 12/31/2019 2:12 PM