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Cut the Sugar

 

 
Cut The Sugar campaign image showing sugary drinks contribute to chronic diseases like tooth decay, diabetes, and obesity.
 
 


 

Drinking too many sugary drinks may lead to developing chronic diseases.

Graphic of a blood sugar tester with the word diabetes and a tooth with the words tooth decay.Graphic of a scale with the words “weight gain and obesity” and a heart with the words “heart disease.” 
  

Sugary drinks are beverages with any added sugar or caloric sweeteners. 

"Regular” or non-diet sodas, sports drinks, and energy drinks are all sugary drinks. Sweetened coffees and teas, aguas frescas, flavored milk, and juice drinks are also sugary drinks.

Graphic of the silhouettes of sodas, sports drinks, and energy drinks.Graphic of the silhouettes of coffee drinks, sweet teas, and aguas frescas.Graphic of the silhouettes of flavored milks and juice drinks. 
 

How much sugar is too much?

Graphic saying, “The American Heart Association recommends the following limits on daily added sugar intake.”Children under 2 should have 0 teaspoons, and children ages 2-18 should have less than 6 teaspoons of sugar daily.Women should have less than 6 teaspoons, and men should have less than 9 teaspoons of sugar daily. 
 

  

The amount of added sugar in most sugary drinks is more than the recommended daily limits.

The number of teaspoons of added sugar in each beverage pictured below are approximated. The exact number of teaspoons may vary by brand.

Graphic of the sugar content of 20 ounce soda, 20 ounce sweet tea, and a 16 ounce energy drink. Graphic of the sugar content of a 16 ounce coffee drink, a 12 ounce soda, and a 20 ounce sports drink.Graphic of the sugar content of a 16 ounce juice drink an 8 ounce flavored milk, and a 6 ounce juice drink. 
 
Drinking sugary drinks adds up.

Graphic saying, “If you drink a 12 ounce can of soda every day for a year, you will consume over 30 pounds of added sugar.”Graphic showing that a 12 ounce can of soda multiplied by 365 days is equal to 33 pounds of added sugar each year. 
  

Reduce sugar. Reduce risk of chronic disease. Choose water or low-fat milk instead of sugary drinks. 

Drinking water is important to help your body work best. Use these tips to help you hydrate better with water.* 


Graphic of a water bottle and the number 30 with the words, “Carry a refillable water bottle. Drink water every 30 minutes.”Graphic of fruits, veggies, and a plate, saying, “Flavor water with fresh herbs, fruits, and veggies. Drink water during meals.” 


 

*Breastmilk and formula provide the fluids babies need for the first 6 months. Consult your pediatrician for more information about when to add water to your child’s diet.


 

 
For more information, please contact:
Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention (CDIP)
1400 Parkmoor Avenue, Suite 120 B
San Jose, CA 95126
Phone: 408-793-2700
Fax: 408-793-2731
 

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Last updated: 8/21/2018 11:46 AM