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Diseases and Surveillance

West Nile Virus
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West Nile Virus
West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne disease that was first detected in the West Nile District of Uganda. Transmitted by mosquito bites, WNV affects humans, horses, some birds, and squirrels.
Lyme Disease
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Lyme Disease
Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks.
Western Equine Encephalitis
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Western Equine Encephalitis
Western equine encephalitis is a disease that is spread to horses and humans by infected mosquitos. It is one of a group of mosquito-borne virus diseases that can affect the central nervous system and cause severe complications and even death. Other similar diseases are eastern equine encephalitis, St Louis encephalitis, and La Crosse encephalitis.
Arenavirus in California
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Arenavirus in California
Arenavirus infection linked to deaths California. SACRAMENTO
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
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Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Hantaviruses are a family of viruses named for the Hantaan River in Korea, where the first strain was discovered decades ago.
Leptospirosis
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Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that affects humans and animals. The incubation period is commonly about10 days (range, 2 days to 4 weeks). Symptoms can include flu-like illness (high fever, headache, chills, muscle aches), jaundice, conjunctivitis, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and sometimes a rash.
Common Raccoon Roundworm
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Common Raccoon Roundworm
"Raccoons are peridomestic animals, which means they live in or around areas where people live. Roundworm eggs are passed in the feces of infected raccoons. Raccoons defecate in communal sites, called latrines. Raccoon latrines are often found at bases of trees, unsealed attics, or on flat surfaces such as logs, tree stumps, rocks, decks, and rooftops. As more raccoons move into populated areas, the number and density of their latrines will increase." -CDC
Last updated: 5/8/2018 1:46 PM